Every three years, teenagers around the world are tested on their abilities in maths, science and reading, as part of PISA, the Programme for International Student Assessment. Basically, it’s a way of comparing how well...

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When you’re raising a bilingual child and you’re the the only source of one of your child’s two or more languages, it can be a good idea to try and find other people or places...

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Learning to read is an important step in your child’s development. When children start to learn to read depends on the country they live in. In some parts of the world, like the UK, children...

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In Hot off the Press, I tell you about a recently published study from Canada. This research deals with two important factors in bilingual language development, namely how early you start (age) and how much contact...

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Children who grow up hearing two or more languages do not always end up actively using all their languages as they get older. In such cases, it’s typically the heritage or minority language which suffers...

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In this episode of Kletsheads we talk about one of the greatest frustrations faced by parents raising their children bilingually: you speak consistently to them in the heritage or home language and they consistently respond...

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Children start talking when they are around one year old. However, we know from research that they are already working on language before that. In this episode, we learn what exactly babies know about language....

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In this special bonus episode of Kletsheads we have a podcast crossover. We are delighted to share an episode of the Much Language Such Talk podcast, an English language podcast that answers questions about language, learning, and culture. The...

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“You’re wobbling the whole time the table! This is what my bilingual son said to his sister when they were playing a board game sat together at a small table and big sister was apparently...

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